News

Toxics in Packaging

Recently, major retailers have begun requesting certifications from vendors confirming that their products comply with the “Toxics in Packaging Laws.” These laws, enacted in nineteen states,[1] prohibit the intentional use of any amount of lead, cadmium, mercury, or hexavalent chromium in packaging or individual packaging components, such as inks and labels. In addition, total concentration levels of unintended or incidental regulated metals in a package or packaging component are limited to less than 100 parts per million (0.01%) by weight. Generally, these materials appear in plastic packaging but may appear in other materials particularly through coatings and pigments. The restrictions imposed by these state laws are distinct from other federal lead limits such as those established by the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008.

Read more

   

New Mandatory Data Security Filing Requirements to be Implemented Soon "The 10+2 Rule"

Background

The SAFE Ports Act of 2006 directed U.S. Customs and Border Protection ("CBP") to gather additional data elements before goods are shipped to the U.S. to enable CBP to better evaluate the security risk of incoming shipments. After consulting with the trade, CBP issued proposed regulations entitled "Importer Security Filing and Additional Carrier Requirements" in which they outlined a program which requires the submission of additional data elements at least 24 hours before the goods are laden on board an ocean vessel.

Read more

   

Customs Proposal to Eliminate “First Sale” Method of Appraisement

On January 24, 2008, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) published a proposed interpretation of the customs valuation laws that would result in the elimination of the so-called first sale rule of appraisement. This memorandum provides additional information concerning CBP’s proposal.

Read more

   

Potential For Significant Duty Refunds For Apparel And Footwear

An issue is being developed in the U.S. Court of International Trade (“CIT”) which, if successful, may provide your company with an opportunity to obtain duty refunds. A test case has already been filed by one importer with respect to glove importations, but litigation will be required with respect to other commodities in order to secure refunds.

Read more

   

Page 30 of 31

News